RANDOM ACTIONS:
Stack
Man
Bristled
Communicated
Bypassed
Toe
Spoil

RANDOM STARTERS:
where must
how to become
how to prevent
where did
what
who wouldn't
can

RANDOM TRAITS:
Cynical
Popular
Immoral
Correct
Essential
Alert
Prominent
Biological

# The In-the-News Article Template
Most people watch the news and know what’s happening around the world.
They like to be up-to-date, and a lot of people are also curious about the life of famous actors, singers, and so on.
You can use that interest to make an intriguing article where you make a connection between the world that everybody knows and your topic area.
This is how to use the In-the-News Article Template:
1: Pick some news that everybody is talking about.
Examples:
Britney Spears cuts her hair off.
Obama’s old car for sale for $1 million.
World of Warcraft loses several million players.
2: Relate the news to your topic in an unusual way, and write a great headline.
Examples:
“What can Britney Spears Teach Us About Web Marketing”
“World of Warcraft Gives a Free Lesson in How to Shoot Yourself in the Foot – How Are You Treating Your Customers,”
“How to Turn Your Old Car Into Gold – This is What You Can Learn From Obama”
3: Write an introduction to your article giving a short resume of the popular news.
Even though everybody talks about it today, it might be forgotten tomorrow, and you would want your article to have a long life.
4: Jot down a list of points you can drag from the news you chose and relate to your field.
5: Make each of those points an introduction to a bulleted paragraph.
Example:
Become president: If you want to sell your car for a lot more than you ever paid for it, it helps if you’ve been the president of the United States.
Less can do it, though, you could for example… (and so on.)
6: If you need some more meat on your article, make a sub-header and state the opposite of what your headline promised.
Examples:
“What Britney Still Has to Learn”
“What World of Warcraft Can Teach Your About Listening to Your Customers”
“What Obama Could Have Done to Double the Price of his Old Car”
7: Summon up the article in a short conclusion about why this particular news can take your business or personal development to the next level, and lead into your resource box, if you’re writing for syndication, traffic or back links.

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BASIC QUESTIONS:
Who
What
Why
Where
When
How

JOURNALIST QUESTIONS:
Who did that?
What happened?
Where did it take place?
When did it take place?
Why did that happen?
How did it happen?

FURTHER QUESTIONS:
Whom?
Which?
Whose?
How far? 
How long? 
How much? 
How many?
How come?
Why not?
Why didn't?